Program Notes Tag

La Traviata, Realism, and Marginality

Posted by Ross Hagen in Online Learning

La Traviata is often cited as a progressive development in opera because it is concerned with portraying realistic stories of everyday people as opposed to mythical allegories that reflected the values and social position of the elite classes. However, the realism of La Traviata is…

La Traviata, A highlight reel

Posted by Ross Hagen in Online Learning

In this page, we have a sort of “highlight reel” of notable moments from La Traviata. I have compiled these from a 2005 production by the Salzburg Opera that is freely available on Youtube in high resolution with English subtitles. Each link will have a…

La Traviata, Glossary and Works Cited

Posted by Ross Hagen in Online Learning

Aria: a solo scene in an opera in which a character expresses inner feelings to the audience, roughly analogous to the Shakespearean soliloquy Brindisi: a drinking song, typically introduced as a toast by one character Cabaletta: the fast final part of a solo scene or…

When Money Grew on Trees

Posted by Opera Gal in Program Notes

When Money Grew on Trees: The Rubber Boom and the Creation of an Opera House in the Jungle By Rex Fuller, Written for Opera Colorado “Florencia Grimaldi’s brilliant voice will reopen a theater’s dormant lock,” declares Riolobo as the El Dorado departs the docks in…

Lonely Creatures

Posted by Jeff Counts in Program Notes

Daniel Catán once referred to composers as “lonely creatures” and as a member in good standing of that peculiar cohort, he too was willingly doomed to eternal creative seclusion by his craft. Perhaps also like composers who choose to write for the stage, Catán admitted…

Musical Highlights of Florencia

Posted by Carol Anderson in Music, Program Notes

I’ve selected some of my favorite musical moments from Florencia en el Amazonas and shared some thoughts and observations about each. The music of Florencia is through-composed for each act, meaning there are rarely endings or pauses between scenes; instead most scenes are linked through…